Michelle Pound On Mindfulness At Work, Shifting Your Self Worth & Creating Your Dream Life.

Written By Sean Grabowski

A passionate ambassador, educator and student of mindfulness and meditation. Advocate for unique experiences and life long learning.

February 17, 2019

In this episode, I had the chance to sit down and chat with Michelle Pound, a meditation and mindfulness consultant, reiki practitioner, yoga instructor, and health coach. Michelle works with companies to cultivate and maintain good mental health and thriving work environments through meditation and mindfulness. We discussed the benefits of having a work culture that supports employees’ overall well-being and the impact a personal practice makes in our lives. We also chat about the importance self-worth plays in transforming your life.

You can learn more about Michelle by following her

Instagram @MichellePound

Website www.MichellePound.com

Originally Posted On iTunes

You can find the transcript of our conversation below:

Sean Grabowski:

Hey everybody. Thank you for tuning into the 15th episode of the mindful steward podcast today. I just finished recording an episode with Michelle pound. If you haven’t heard of her yet. She’s a corporate meditation coach in Toronto. She also won the class pass instructor of the year for anyone who it’s from the city and has heard about the class pass program. Um, she used to teach at Lagree and now she teaches yoga. She does a Reiki and she still does meditation, uh, guided meditations on the side, but as well she’s starting a business where she goes into organizations and helps them implement mindfulness practices and strategies and teaches them about the benefits that that can have in their workplace. So most of this episode is about that sort of thing. She kind of talks about the benefits, some of the research, um, and we dive into how meditation and mindfulness has affected us. Okay. And just some of the other things that are related to that industry. And uh, the conversation goes down an interesting path. Uh, I think you’ll enjoy it if you’re into that kind of thing in the first place. But I just wanted to let everyone know, I have been talking about it for a while that I was going to release meditation resources. So I was actually recording those meditations with Michelle. So right now I’m giving away, she’s also giving it away on her website. If you want to subscribe there. Um, I believe it’s Michellpound.com, but I’ll put the link in the bio. Yeah. And uh, but I’m also giving away a guided meditation from her. It turned out really awesome. It’s honestly a really, it’s a really good meditation if you do want to get a hold of that. And I’m also giving away a couple of little eBooks that I’ve created, so, um, you can sign up online. It’s on my website and without further ado, I’ll get this episode started. I hope you enjoy it.

Sean Grabowski:

So recently you have started focusing on a new business of yours doing corporate mindfulness types type of stuff. Yeah. Um, did you want to talk about that a little bit more?

Michelle Pound:

Yeah, for sure. Um, so I work with companies and organizations to implement different meditation and mindfulness techniques to really just empower employees from all levels, usually starting from the top down just so that they can really create happier, healthier work environments. So what I kind of was noticing having worked in the corporate world for a number of years is just a huge level of imbalance. People feeling overworked, overwhelmed, and stressed and anxious. And one thing that I was able to kind of do for myself through meditation is kind of shift all of those feelings and really just be able to focus on and now in the present. And what that did for me from a productivity standpoint, really incredible. I was really able to focus on what exactly it was I was doing, stop procrastinating, really just excelling. Um, and then from there opened my ability to communicate with my colleagues and clients to kind of have a perspective where I was a little more zoomed out, a little more of an observer and didn’t have to react to anything that was said, but kind of really just listen. And that also just really inspired a lot of creativity where I didn’t feel blocked, I felt open and I just saw that kind of translating to the people around me.

Sean Grabowski:

Cool. So at the time, where were you working when you we’re noticing that kind of thing.

Michelle Pound:

Um, so I was working for a company called indeed labs and I worked in eCommerce and was a digital and social media manager and just kind of saw that we were like a small team and we all had really different communication styles and I’m just kind of being able to observe what was going around me and wanting to kind of change things and not be reactive was kind of what propelled me to start moving in that direction of mindfulness.

Sean Grabowski:

Awesome. Uhmm. Yeah, I know for myself personally, I found that, I mean meditation has so many different benefits. All the things you kind of listed I would say the biggest realization for myself is that it kind of snaps you out of just autopilot thinking and just the autopilot mind in general, which is when you feel stressed, you just feel stressed. And that’s the only thing you’re thinking about. And once you start meditating, you feel stress and you observe it and you think about why am I feeling stress? And you start to look at kind of the Mmm. The roots of all those things. And it just teaches you how to really control it because you understand the source of everything.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah. Well our minds are constantly wandering. I would say probably about 50% of the time we are not focused and we’re kind of shifting in this pattern between the past and then the future. And it’s really just hard for us to kind of stay focused on the moment, which creates a lot of unhappiness, a lot of anxiety, a lot of stress. And that translates, you know, not only in work but all kinds of areas of our lives. And so when you learn to kind of cultivate and practice mindfulness and bringing it back to the moment, there’s so many different benefits from physical to emotional to mental, you know, you can really quickly reduce your stress levels just by taking a moment, taking a breath and resetting before you answer, before you write an email, before you go to your next meeting. And that’s really incredible benefit you can see right away. Um, it also just really helps to improve your kind of work and interpersonal relationships. If you’re a little bit more mindful and you can look at things from the perspective outside of yourself, um, and kind of taking that other person’s perspective or just really listened to what they’re saying. Um, so often we are just waiting to respond and speak what we want to say versus actually absorbing what the person is saying to us. So mindfulness really kind of helps on that level. And then from mental benefit, you know, you’re kind of able to improve, um, problem solving and your ability to stay on task. You’re able to kind of see things a little more creatively. And objectively.

Sean Grabowski:

So when it comes to the research on that, I know you were mentioning via email that there’s a lot of different studies about how that affects the workplace. This is all new to me. So.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah, there’s been a lot of research recently just kind of looking at, you know, what mindfulness does for the brain in general and how that kind of helps with your neural pathways. It, it gives you kind of more sense of calm, it reduces stress levels. Um, there’s a lot of scientific studies that show the, the importance of having a mental break. Yeah. Think about when you go on a vacation and you come back and you feel rested or [inaudible], you know, if you take him 40 minutes before kind of timeout and then come back to something, you kind of have fresh eyes. So we’re kind of in this culture where we’re expected to work these really insane hours and we’re burning out and we feel so unbalanced and you’re seeing so much sickness and disease and there’s just so much power too. Allowing your mind to pause, to break and [inaudible]. There’s various studies from the top schools in the world to top researchers from Harvard, Yale, Stanford, that are really speaking to this in the power of just pausing.

Sean Grabowski:

Cool. I know in my office we have a meditation room literally in my corner of the floor. Okay. I mean, I work at a company that’s fairly progressive with that kind of thing. Definitely really progressive as far as the world of business goes. I think the Toronto, at least in general, has that a quality, but nobody ever goes in that room, never. Mm. So I think it’s a really cool thing. What you’re doing is kind of, yeah. Trying to promote awareness of how’s that going to actually help people, um, and get through the day. I feel like I could even use it sometimes. Like I have a different approach. I was telling you, like, I, when I need a break, I’ll go and just like journal for like one or two pages and it just, for some reason, for me, that calms my mind so much. I don’t even know if it’s because I programmed it to make me feel that way or what um, I think there’s such a big benefit of like taking those little breaks at work, but actually making them, making really good use of them, by meditating in a powerful way.

Michelle Pound:

So what is kind of the conversation around the mindfulness room or the meditation room with your company?

Sean Grabowski:

Okay. There’s really no conversation. We’ve been told that it’s there, you can go in it whenever you want. Mmm. And that’s it.

Michelle Pound:

So I think that’s kind of probably why maybe there’s lack of use of that room is it’s one thing to have a meditation room and it’s another thing to be a mindful business or a mindful company. And it’s really looking at, you know, why do you have these things? Why are you implementing mindfulness? And if your employees don’t understand and if that’s not a core value or a principle that you preach, it’s going to be a disconnect. And in this case, an empty meditation room. And so that’s kind of what I also saw there was in bit of an issue of looking at you, the fact that there is an issue and that people have stress and there’s issues with mental health and stress leave. But just saying, Hey, here’s a meditation room and not, you know, doing something proactive for your employees, isn’t it really cultivating a mindful business. And so when I work with different companies and organizations, that’s kind of the number one thing that I do is it’s not just me going in and leading a guided meditation because while that is great for those 15 to 20 minutes, it’s more about what are your employees going to do when I leave. And so what are the tools and tactics that we can create together to implement into your organization as a whole that this is top of mind always. Not just for that one session.

Sean Grabowski:

So it’s more about teaching the actual habits and how to maintain that mindful lifestyle. Mmm. And meditate regularly.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah, I mean a daily practice is so essential and you know, when you think of a business and when they talk about their core values and their visions and investing in their people, well what does that actually look like? And so yeah, creating a culture of mindfulness that is completely infused throughout your company, people will be able to feel that. There’ll be able to be attracted to that and it will kind of surface all throughout your business, not just a room. [inaudible].

Sean Grabowski:

Cool. Yeah, I mean I totally agree. I think Mmm. I really started taking meditation more seriously when a lot of the YouTube I think there’s a lot of, okay YouTube people who are some of the more influential sources of information in my life and it’s just people who are really interested in their own development and they’re always experimenting with different things and making little videos about how it works and the things that they really like and just teaching all the different angles of it. And they all started claiming and all their videos meditate. That was the one thing I would say that everyone needs to be doing is meditating. And then I read a book again a little bit later, I forget what it was called. Yeah. Mmm. Okay. You talked about the practices of, of some of the top performing CEOs Mmm. In the world of business and just looked at the similarities of all of them. And I was surprised by this, but one of the similarities was they all have a practice of mindfulness. They all meditate or do something along those lines every single day. And the other one was the they have cold showers in the morning. And I think the other one was, uh, a morning routine. Most of the time, the morning routine was all of those things. It was cold shower, meditate, and then get on and then like a healthy breakfast or whatever else. So, I mean, I think it’s like a little bit of a life hack that some people have figured out and soon people like you, I think the world is really starting to become awakened to it, but it’s, we don’t have to necessarily pop pills or do all these different things to feel better. You can really take control of your own state of mind.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah, I mean I think it’s really important to kind of bring the dialogue back around to the individual and to their salads and knowing that they don’t have to look to these external sources, but they have that ability to empower themselves from within. And meditation is just one of those tools to do that where you’re really taking a second to pause and tune into that moment that you’re in and just reflect on your breath, on your, what you’re feeling, being connected to your body and just allowing that mind to kind of relax and release. And from there you can kind of get clarity. Um, you know, we have thousands of thoughts a day and 90% of our thoughts aren’t even real. They’re just stories that we create. And it’s based on our kind of unique filter that we have of the world and how we see things and then we can impose that on other people. So we, when we kind of take a second, we get quiet and we’re not giving every single thought power. Um, that in itself is so rewarding and it allows you to kind of start staying small and not getting so bogged down with all of these kind of ideas or distractions. And I think that’s why like some of the world’s leading minds in business are. avid meditators, you know, everyone from Rupert Murdoch to Oprah Winfrey to Russell Simmons and Arianna Huffington all talk about how important it is to kind of have this meditation practice. And it works on so many different levels because you can really just step away. And that in itself to me is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself the time to just pause. do you think that we live in an overstimulating world right now?

Michelle Pound:

100% I mean half the time when people are having conversations or are with each other in general, they’re not present. They’re checking Instagram or they’re thinking about the email they have to send or they forgot to turn off the oven or something and people just can’t be in the moment. It’s always like, what’s around me? What’s next? And it’s really hard just to stay focused.

Sean Grabowski:

Yeah. I have a few things to say about a few things you’ve said in the last couple of minutes, but one thing that I’ve, I’ve heard I read a lot of content around these topics, so what I hear one stat, I don’t think that much of it, but when I hear it over and over again, it starts to really stick with me, especially if I’m hearing it from different sources. And one thing I’ve heard a few times now is that 80 to 90% of your thoughts in a day on an average day or just the same thoughts from the day before. So it goes to show that your thoughts are a habit. They really are thinking negatively. It’s more of a habit than it is anything. meditation. I think that’s where some of the most powerful aspects of it is. You become to tone down those automatic thoughts, just come to you out of pure habit. Um, but I think when it comes to overstimulation, uh, like our brains are not evolved to live in a world where we see like a hundred flashy ads every minute we walk down the street and things like that. We’re not, I mean, some people like to argue that, but from what I’ve read, it takes over 10,000 years for the human body to evolve a new trait or to you know, adapt an actual evolved characteristic. So, um, no, like we’re not evolved for that. You can get used to it. You can learn how to deal with things. Mmm. And I think that’s why meditation is so important now because our world is just going to become more and more like that. Yeah. Maybe like 50 years ago when things were honestly a lot more simple. Like let’s say before the TV was invented, the most stimulating thing was the radio. Maybe going to like a show, like a play. Mmm. That’d be the most stimulating thing you would experience or a sports game. So was meditation as important back then? Maybe not. Well like right now we live in a pretty crazy time.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah. 100% and even to think about, you know, when you, we were a kids and what we would do is, you know, some of those things are obsolete, like going a block Buster are just simple things of walking outside in nature. And there’s a lot of kind of fear in culture right now and a lot of isolation where, you know, we’re kind of in this world where we’re more social than ever. We’re more connected from an online perspective. But when people are in the presence of other pupils, sometimes they don’t even know how to act. People don’t make eye contact. Or if they do, they immediately look away and they’re shifting their energy. If things aren’t posted on social media, did it really happen? And so it’s a really interesting time. And those kind of basic human elements of the having a feeling of connectedness are kind of shifting away. And that translates, you know, of course from work to personal relationships and really, meditation kind of brings you back to that simplicity. And you know, maybe they didn’t have those things 50 years ago, but then maybe people were sitting with themselves a bit more and journaling or reading physical books or going on meditative walks. And so it was kind of a different practice of mindfulness and it’s interesting that now we literally have to make time to go inward. It’s not something that we’re comfortable doing because we are so stimulated all the time that we feel as though if we’re not doing a million things, then we’re not being productive when sometimes the most productive thing we could ever do is to be still.

Sean Grabowski:

Uhmm take a few moments for ourselves.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah. Isn’t that a luxury Sophia? Lesser doing these days.

Sean Grabowski:

Honestly, it’s pretty wild that that is, can be seen as a luxury but I love that you brought up connections there. Connecting with other people. Mmm. I read a book recently called, yeah. Oh, I forget who it was by some guy named Johann something and it was called lost connections, the underlying causes of anxiety and depression. Mmm. And it’s a book from like two years ago, this guy went around the world talking to the leading researchers on anxiety and depression. And there’s a lot of different factors, but in a nutshell, the biggest contributors, two Mmm. To those disorders. And those kinds of feelings are lack of connection with other people around you. And that means true connection, you know, like laughing around a bonfire with your friends and you’re like literally sharing moments that you’re going to remember as opposed to like, I dunno, just some, something where you’re not fully present, you know? Mmm. And community having like a healthy community around you. And that’s why when you look at, you know, it’s something we’ve heard time and time again, but you know, you look up people who live in huts in, I dunno, Papa new Guinea or something and they literally live off coconuts and mangoes and they’re like super poor. They can’t afford anything. They have to grow everything they survive off. Mmm. They’re happy. They’re like really happy communities because they’re like their whole day, every minute of their day is filled with community and connection with other people. Yeah. And it’s so simple. Their lives.

Michelle Pound:

I think that community is fundamental to human life. When you think about human history and how we’re so tribal by nature, you know, from being hunters and gatherers to living and communities and people contributing in different way. It’s so important and it’s how we’ve always thrived and connected. And so with kind of evolution and just the way the world is now, um, there’s a lot of isolation and that 100% creates kind of anxiety and, and separation and stress and people. And we see all these kinds of new mood disorders are these different things coming out and it just is so interesting because if we really kind of take things back and simplify, you know, what does happiness mean? It means connection and just feeling love, feeling value. Um, there’s so much power in just having a conversation with someone, just having physical touch with somebody. And we’ve come to kind of this place in the world where we’re so busy trying to look good to other people. Um, and consumerism and materialism and comparisons, comparing ourselves to other people that were really so disconnected about just connecting.

Sean Grabowski:

So I was, I remember I was telling you last time we were talking. Um, but like I’m from a city much smaller than Toronto and I’ve only lived here for less than a year. And I mean I love Toronto. I’m having a lot of fun here. I’m enjoying it for everything it can provide. I’m feeding off the energy of the city in a lot of different ways. But one thing that I point out just cause I notice it so much is like where I’m from, it’s still one, it’s like the 10th biggest city in Canada. It’s a London, Ontario. And when you walk past people, everyone kind of like, you look at people, even if you don’t talk to them, everyone looks at each other. There’s a lot of hellos exchanged. Things like that are very normal. And I get it. It’s a huge city. There’s too many people. But I make a point of saying hi to people a lot here just to just half of it is to gauge their reaction. Cause I live on a pretty quiet street here and people will be out there walking their dog and there’ll be just me and them on the whole street. Then I’ll say hi to them and they’ll be thrown off. It’s like, I find, I mean it’s just a big city, you know, there’s a lot of stimulation and there’s a lot of people and I find that you can get lost in the lack of connection with other people. Like we’re all just everyone, we’re all just people here doing our own thing, trying to live our lives, you know?

Michelle Pound:

Yeah. It’s so interesting. Um, one thing that I will notice is if I make eye contact with somebody, especially if it’s on a street car or a state, as soon as you make eye contact with somebody, they look away. And actually right before I came here, I was getting coffee and I saw the cashier. I was kind of tuned out and gazing out while I walked up and said, I just said, Oh, what are you looking at? And then we just started to have a conversation and the other cashier came in. We kind of talked about how people don’t make eye contact with each other and people don’t say how, Hey, how are you right away? It’s just about what do we want to, what do we want to get from this situation? And um, again, I think it’s, uh, looking at ourselves as individuals and the individual needs versus looking at ourselves a collective as a community. Um, if someone isn’t someone that we know in our immediate group of friends or family, we create a distinction of us versus them. And when we kind of are able to break down that barriers, kind of magical things can happen where we have conversations or we learn things from somebody that we never know. And in the end, we really can just see that we’re all the same. We all kind of have the same struggles, the same kind of hopes and dreams. And so it’s a matter of making that point to say hello and to keep doing it, even if it feels uncomfortable for the other person, because that really should be the norm, not walking around in isolation.

Sean Grabowski:

Yeah, absolutely. Um, when I first moved here, that was one of the things that I kind of had to adjust to, mostly when I’m taking transit to work. And I, that would be the same anywhere, to be honest, like people or just doing their own thing, you know, on their commute. It’s almost like a time to relax before you get to work and have to talk to people and do stuff all day. So I get it. Um, but for months, I just kind of, well actually I bike to work almost all summer. I don’t know why I’m even saying that, but when winter hit and I first started taking the subway to my office, um, I found it almost weird. Like I’d be looking around, I would see somebody who had something that I almost wanted to ask them about. Just something that made me curious. But I would say to myself, you know what? No one talks to anyone here. It’d be weird if I said something to them and then a few weeks, like not a few, like a few weeks into winter, my commuting season, I guess I decided to just say hi to people every time I have any curiosity and it’s almost become a goal now where I’m like, all right, I’m going to have to talk to at least a couple people every day on the way to, on my commute. Even if it’s just like a little, a little comment, like something funny happens and I just like look over to someone and say something and I’m just barely doing, doing the bare minimum of communicating with people, but I’m the only one doing it, which is so crazy to me.

Michelle Pound:

How does it feel when you’re kind of having these exchanges with strangers?

Sean Grabowski:

Oh, it feels awesome because everyone’s caught off guard I think. I think everyone actually likes it. Everyone likes it a lot.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah. I like it a lot.

Sean Grabowski:

It also feels good, like overcoming that fear of talking to strangers for no reason also, you know?

Michelle Pound:

Yeah. I mean I think we all are just kind of scared of each other, which is kind of funny to think about and you know, so much can happen by just being kind saying hello could be really the most kind thing you do to because we don’t know what each other is going through and it’s such simple acts of kindness that kind of really allow the world to shift all around us. Yeah.

Sean Grabowski:

Have you ever heard of the word Sonder? No, let’s talk about it. Okay, so I love this word. I like want to write a bunch of stuff around just this one word. Okay. It’s not even a dictionary word, but it’s one of those terms. It’s being used a lot. I don’t know people are using it, but it’s not an official word yet. I’ve like looked it up and everything, but Sonder is like the sudden realization that every person around you is dealing with things and has a life equally as complex as your own. And it’s such an interesting idea when you’re like walking down the street and you see people and normally you just look at them and you’re like, Oh that’s an old guy. Or that’s an, that’s a, I know that’s, Oh no, a guy in a suit or something. But then you actually look at them and try and picture what their life is like. Cause it’s probably we have just as many crazy complex thoughts that they’re trying to figure out in their own mind. Exactly as many as you do. No.

Michelle Pound:

Yeah, 100% very cool kind of word. I’ve definitely, you know, felt what that word encompass is and kind of having curiosity about other people I think is so important. And to kind of take your world outside of yourself for a moment and you know, we always heard the term of see yourself in someone else’s shoes but okay, actually do that. It really just opens you up on so many more levels. You can be more compassionate, more empathetic, and also less lonely knowing that, you know, as a collective we experienced so much pain but also so much joy as well. And so sharing that with other people is really kind of what makes life worth living. [inaudible].

Sean Grabowski:

So I’m going to change the topic, but before I leave the general meditation, mindfulness specific realm of this conversation, um, I was just going to ask you like what, what is your approach with what you’re doing with your business? So are you basically trying to go into companies and run seminars or you try to go in and kind of train the employees or train the HR people on how to bring about a mindfulness culture?

Michelle Pound:

Yes. So it kind of varies depending on who I’m working with, but there’s kind of three main things that I do. So there’s workshops that are based around the principle of mindfulness and then meditation. Um, and those are kind of more of an hour to an hour and a half depending on what the time looks like. And that’s kind of like a little taster of here’s some things that you can do, usually three easy steps to implement into your organization and see benefits right away. Yeah. And then I kind of do more in depth work, which would be more longer trainings in that could be anything from half a day to an eight week program to longer depending on what the organization is looking for. And that’s really to kind of make overall organizational change where you know, when companies say they really want to invest in their people, this is kind of them really speaking their truth and starting that change from the top and really embodying that and funneling it down on all levels of the organization so that it truly becomes, a mindful work environment. And then there’s just the component of meditation where you know, there’s curiosity of what exactly is meditation and how does it work and can we do this? And so then just working and doing a guided meditation and opening up the door of curiosity and possibility for people in the workplace.

Sean Grabowski:

Cool. Yeah, and I mean we recorded them a little meditation a couple of weeks ago that I’m giving away my website. Is that the one you’re giving away on your website?

Michelle Pound:

I’m giving away on my website too.

Sean Grabowski:

Okay, awesome. And it turned out super awesome. I was honestly, I mean I knew that you did this professionally anyways, but I was really impressed with how well it turned out. So if anyone is an HR manager or is looking for this kind of thing in their office, I would definitely recommend Michelle. Okay, so I’m gonna start my question off with a little quote cause I feel like this is just such a good way to word it, but this is a quote from a book that I’ve been listening to.

Sean Grabowski:

I have the audio book. Um, I was telling you about it, but it’s called Reality Transurfing by the Vadim Zeland and he’s an old astrophysicist from Russia and all his stuff is translated, which just as a side note, it’s, I find it really interesting that all these physicists turn into really spiritual people through their studies. I find that so intriguing. Like you look at Albert Einstein and a lot of other, a lot of other people. Um, and they start talking about the law of attraction and all these weird esoteric things. Um, there was one guy, I can’t even remember his name, but he was like the leading physicist in all of England for like for years. He ran like all their programs for research. And his statement at his retirement was after all these years in this industry, I’ve come to the firm realization that there is a God, there are these really weird rules to our universe that I just can’t understand. And anyways, that’s just an intro to this little quote. But the quote is, do not be fooled by the thought that things could have, could not have turned out any differently. That is a form of self justification that allows us to continue operating in the same form, never working to change our thoughts or actions. It’s another notion of looking outside ourselves for validation instead of forcing to look within and observe. I think that’s the one I want it to read. So, so this is one thing that I find really interesting because I find you to be a really spiritual person, and I’ve met a lot of really spiritual people in the last few years, but there’s this, there’s almost two types of spiritual people who I talk to a lot. And there are a lot of people who Mmm. They look at the world as if the, if they think the right things, then the, the universe is just going to happen to them. You know, they don’t believe that they have any control over it. It’s this really kind of passive way of backing off and being like, I’ll just let things happen how they’re supposed to. And then there’s other people who they believe in it, all of the spiritual Mmm beliefs, but they’re out there like getting, getting shit done and like doing a lot of really cool stuff. And when something isn’t there, is it really turning out maybe how they want it to turn out? It doesn’t mean that they back off, but they typically do something about it. Mmm. So I wanted to ask you, because you’re a really spiritual person, but you’re doing a lot of different stuff and you’re making a lot of cool things happen for you. So, um, all like you’re a go getter from what I see, you wake up, Oh like 5:00 AM or whatever, or at least you were going super early classes and then I’m working all day on your new business and whatnot. So what is your take on that polarity of perspectives?

Michelle Pound:

Yeah, I mean for me, I think when it comes down to spirituality, there’s no right or wrong, what I would say, what kind of might differentiate is really comes down to self worth. And so sometimes when we say we’re one thing, we might feel we’re actually not worthy of that thing. And that creates a really strong disconnect. And then that kind of comes through with why something isn’t manifesting for you or turning out the way that you would like it to. And so, you know, being a mindfulness and meditation instructor and being around a lot of spiritually in tune people. Um, one thing that I would say is there’s kind of some weird energy around money or abundance and um, this kind of belief that, um, you know, money is the root of all evil or you can’t be spiritual and be really successful. But that’s definitely not true. I think money is an energy and it’s reflective of how you feel about yourself and what you’re worthy of. And if you are going and bringing a complete change to people’s lives through your presence, your energy, what you’re teaching, where you’re giving in the world, then you should be rewarded for that. And also when it comes to kind of being in action, your life should be about what you want to create for yourself. And you are 100% responsible for creating the life that you want to live. You know, life kind of doesn’t happen to you. It happens through you. And so what is it that you actually really want to create? And if you want a big beautiful life, then you’re going to have to take control and create that for yourself. And it can look so different depending on where you are in your life. I think life is a constant spiral and we’re always kind of evolving. There’s always periods of contraction, but if you really want something, the most incredible thing is you can make it happen. Our entire world is full of people’s dreams come true. It’s because they had the courage to go out and pursue them.

Sean Grabowski:

Yeah. I think that looking at that exact perspective in a really practical way too, just for my own, my own, uh, experience. Um, you also, when you start doing things to better yourself, you become more comfortable with the thought of the good things that those bring to you. Like it’s such a simple thought, but it’s just like, did you have to have just enough discipline to get yourself started? Cause once you get yourself started, you’ll get motivated based off that and then suddenly you’ll acquire all these new skills and then you’ll feel confident in those skills. And it’s just like, it does take a bit of discipline, but…

Michelle Pound:

Yeah, it’s kind of like anything, right? I say like mindfulness is like a muscle and you have to do it every single day. You don’t have to do it for an hour a day, but at least like commit to a minute and you build up resilience over time. And so, you know, like a, you probably are not going to be in the NBA if you practice basketball for one hour a week. But if you commit to it every single day, um, amazing things will happen. And so being mindful is, you know, really developing that resilience, that skillset that allows you to grow and expand in so many ways. And what is guaranteed is kind of now, tomorrow isn’t a guarantee and we always kind of take that for granted. So if you could do something for a few minutes every day to change your life, what you, and if you’re not, why.

Sean Grabowski:

So when it comes to all the cool things that you’re doing right now, where can people find you or connect with you?

Michelle Pound:

Yes. So you can find me on Instagram at Michelle pound, or you can connect with me at my website, which is, uh, Michelle pan.com. And by me there connect with me, shoot me an email or a DM. I always love talking to new people and helping them on this journey of mindfulness.

Sean Grabowski:

Awesome. Cool. Well thanks for taking the time to do this episode.

Michelle Pound:

Thank you for having me.

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